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DAID is a local government authority operating under Letters Patent

The purpose of DAID is to maintain the section of dike from Dewdney Trunk Road and Lougheed Highway in Mission, BC to Bell Road in Dewdney, BC.  This dike keeps the Fraser River from flooding the properties on the flood plain north of the river.

The pumping facilities are located at the end of Hatzic slough and are comprised of two stork pumps (1948 vintage) with a capacity of 6390gpm. each and flood boxes. In 2014 a new pump station with 3 new pumps was installed. The pumps are operated when there is high water inside the dike. When the level of the Fraser River is lower then the level of water inside the dike, floodgates automatically open allowing water to discharge into the river. The floodgates only close if the Fraser River becomes higher then the water level inside the dike.

The dike is mowed three times a year and any encroaching trees and blackberry vines etc. are removed.  The dike is patrolled daily by the maintenance person and it is his responsibility to monitor and report any damage to the dike and or wear  that needs repairing or replacing.

Trustees:

Nine trustees are elected from the property owners by the property owners.

Trustees represent three localized zones with in the Improvement District namely Dewdney, Hatzic Lake and Hatzic Prairie.  Traditionally there are three trustees elected for each zone.

2021 – 2022 Trustees:

Ray Boucher Chair  –   Hatzic Prairie
Rick Dekker Dewdney
Elske Von Hardenberg Dewdney
Ross Thompson Dewdney
Greg Hawksby Hatzic Lake
Jim Loewen Hatzic Lake
Debbie McKay Hatzic Lake
Steve Anderson Hatzic Prairie
Richard Astell Hatzic Prairie

Management Team:

Administration/Finance Officer Heather Thompson
Operations Manager: David Scott
Facilities Maintenance Manager: Ron Beck

A dike is a stone or earthen wall constructed as a defense or as a boundary. The best known form of dike is a construction built along the edge of a body of water to prevent it from flooding onto an adjacent lowland.

Dikes can be permanent earthworks or emergency constructions (often of sandbags) built hastily in a flood emergency.